Occupational Therapy New Zealand Whakaora Ngangahau Aotearoa

Recent OTNZ-WNA submissions

Mental Health and Addictions Inquiry

Disability Learning Support Action Plan

Letter to Prime Minister Ardern- 271017 

HRC Effect of Science discussion 

Letter to Chair of Education and Science Committee- January 2017

Letter to Hon. Hekia Parata- December 2016

Letter in reply to Des Gorman- June 2016

Letter in reply from Des Gorman- May 2016

Letter to Des Gorman (Exec Chair Health Workforce NZ)- March 2016 – OTNZ-WNA response to Health Workforce New Zealand, Health Workforce report.

Letter to Chai Chuah- October 2015 – Invitation to attend council outlining the meeting objectives.

Letter to Hon. Jonathan Coleman- March 2015 – The importance of the Allied Health profession in the future of New Zealand’s health system.

WHO Disability Action Plan 2014 – 2021

Framing the Future 2013

Employment Relations Act Amendment Bill 2013

Te Mahana: a draft strategy to end homelessness in Wellington by 2020

Welfare Reforms 2013

Health Practitioners’ Competence Assurance Act Review 2012

The Wider Journey: The Rights of Disabled People 2012

Green Paper for Vulnerable Children 2012

WHO Disability Action Plan 2014 – 2021

We strongly endorse the assertion that disability is a public health issue, a human rights issue, and a development issue. Accordingly, we advocate that the Disability Action Plan be brought into alignment with United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals to strongly signal the human rights and development agendas.

Consistent with the statement above, we find that the disability rights claim “nothing about us, without us” is not well represented in the plan. Inherent in the wording there is a sense that rehabilitation is something that health professionals “do to” people with disabilities. That understanding of rehabilitation is contested: rehabilitation services should be provided in collaboration with people with disabilities, in ways that respect their right to be in charge of their own destinies.

Furthermore, all human beings are unique and we would advocate that in giving implementation to any objectives and actions; policies or practices are reflective of the cultural diversity of the different populations. In particular, with due regard to the notion of ‘cultural safety’. Read more…

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Framing the Future 2013

Health Workforce New Zealand have proposed ‘Framing the Future’ – a multi-disciplinary education framework which aims to provide more flexible career pathways. We would advocate that allied health look independently at the idea of a framework, distinct from the scientific and technical professions.

This proposal framework has been developed with exemplars from the scientific and technical health workforce, however, it is not a perfect fit for the subset of allied health, for example, occupational therapy, social work, physiotherapy, and speech-language therapy.

In order for this framework to have broader application across all of allied health there needs to be a much wider and focused exploration of how it could work for other professions, and with active engagement and consultation.  Read more…

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Employment Relations Act Amendment Bill 2013

We oppose clauses 43-47 to remove the legislative right to rest and meal breaks. The current provisions that provide for established rest breaks should remain.

As a profession focused on improving health through occupation, we are aware that any short-term gains achieved by this legislation – especially where employees have little autonomy, earn a low wage, and are not unionised – are likely to have unintended consequences: reduced productivity; contraindicate health and safety initiatives (managing musculoskeletal health and/or cognitive load), and adversely impact the health and well-being of staff (managing fatigue and emotional wellbeing); and risks being an occupational justice issue. Read more…

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Te Mahana: a draft strategy to end homelessness in Wellington by 2020

Boredom and a lack of meaningful activity are common themes coming out of international literature. The UK homelessness strategies ‘Coming in from the cold’ (Key Priority F, 1999); ‘Places of Change’ (Point 4, 2006) and ‘No one left out’ (Action 3, 2008) all acknowledge that resettlement support is not enough. These strategies have helped establish programmes across the UK over the last 13 years that engage people in activities that are meaningful to them that build self-esteem, develop life-skills and connect people with communities away from the street. Read more…

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Welfare Reforms 2013

Working is a complex task and success is dependent upon the person being able to achieve a balanced interaction between the competing demands of their occupations. People’s life routines and habits provide the backbone for work skills to be developed. Understanding, analysing and developing the relationship between a person, their occupations and their physical social and cultural environment is the core skill of occupational therapy, which makes occupational therapists uniquely positioned to provide individualised and evidence-based return-to-work services. Read more…

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Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act Review 2012

For detailed submission – Read more…

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The Wider Journey: The Rights of Disabled People 2012

Engaging in society in a purposeful and meaningful way and to having your voice heard is a basic human right. The New Zealand Association of Occupational Therapists (OTNZ-WNA Aotearoa) fully supports strategies that empower people to do so. In a just and democratic society each person’s right to access information and have a voice should be equally valued. No person’s right to participate and to vote should be lost due to disability. Read more…

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Green Paper for Vulnerable Children 2012

NZAOT recommends a long term cross-party legislative plan that fosters cultural change through:

  • a perspective shift from individualism to collectivism
  • a family centered perspective over a child first perspective / a preventative rather than a reactive legislative plan
  • embedding doing occupations together within our communities as a positive linking experience thereby strengthening each other through developing relationships
  • measures to decrease access to unhealthy habits, occupations and tasks, supplemented with measures to support people to replace unhealthy habits with more positive occupations. Read more…